Sailing Across the North Sea to Norway


Tag: adventures
Across the North Sea to Norway 

By Alec Blanc, Figment II, #212

(reproduced with permission of Mainsheet, the Catalina and Capri Owners Magazine)

The crew assembled at Dover Marina on the evening of Friday 28, April. Figment II was already there, having been delivered from The Solent earlier in the week.

The crew of four had all sailed on figment before during our "shakedown" weekend in the Solent in March, so stowing our gear didn't take as long as we knew all of the nooks and crannies aboard although lots of them were now crammed with food. On our shakedown we had experienced 45 knots of wind and snow in the English Channel, and the crew was interested to notice that since our last stay on board I had fitted lee-cloths to stop them from falling out of bed if the boat was heeled over and an EPIRB, an electronic gadget that uses satellites to send an automatic distress signal to the International Search and Rescue Authorities. Did I know something that the crew didn't?

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Our First Season(ing)


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By Ilene Brandon, ILENE 3 (#445)

(reproduced with permission of Mainsheet, the Catalina and Capri Owners Magazine)

It was one of the final weekends of a spectacular season - the first with our new Catalina 320. We had traded up from a Catalina 30, which was preceded by a Catalina 25. (Guess we're a Catalina family!). We simply loved the new boat. It had all the features we wanted for our type of cruising: an enormous cockpit, a roomy aft cabin (we had always slept in the v-berth on the 25 and 30), more room in the head, a comfortable galley and spacious salon. And if our sons (ages 21 and 23) ever decide they want to spend time with us, which seems unlikely with their social calendars, there's even room for them.

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Southwestbound: Bringing Callisto Back Home


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By David King

Callisto, Hull No. 490

(reproduced with permission of Mainsheet, the Catalina and Capri Owners Magazine)

It was too much fun to stop. With long, rolling seas, a 15-knot breeze on our back and sun in our faces, Callisto was boiling along at 6.5 to 8 knots. Our course, from Cape Porpoise, Maine, to the Annisquam River entrance at Gloucester, Massachusetts, demanded a dead downwind course that just wasn't going to work. No matter, twenty degrees to port made a world of difference, filling the cruising chute and generating the speed to make the Labor Day weekend passage back home from Maine's fabled cruising grounds more fun.
 

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Out There

IF SOMETHING IS GOING TO HAPPEN, IT'S GOING TO HAPPEN OUT THERE.


Tag: adventures

Today had the first trial of the new cruising spinnaker on the new boat.  Spent some time with the sail maker yesterday and then some more time with the Boat US store this morning.  $80 for a snatch block (or as the guy said, a scrank block.  Yeah, whatever)!  And that was the cheap one.   Then $80 for lines.  Total bill $220!  --ygbsm!!!

Anyway, winds were light this afternoon so called Rotor Campbell and we set out to try new sail.  Spent some time setting the rigging (like we knew what we were doing), and then we were off.  Well, winds had been light, but by the time we got on the bay, they had picked up just a bit.  Well, maybe more than just a bit.  May have been due to the line of thunderstorms moving in from on shore. The marina disappeared in a squall line.  Not a problem.  Turned the nose into the wind and brought all the equipment out on deck.  Then fell off onto a broad reach and  prepared to set the sail.  Rotor made the comment "Don't you think we should wait until the white caps stop breaking over the bow?"  Nah!  because if something is going to happen, it's going to happen out there.

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Islands In The Stream - Sailing To The Bahamas


Tag: adventures
Peter J. Clancy

AROBAN C320 #222

( reproduced with permission of the Mainsheet, the Catalina and Capri Owners Magazine)

Quietly slipping across the Gulf Stream in a cool southeast breeze under full moon and star-filled skies, we enjoy a distinct sensation of gliding, not sailing, through an ethereal scene reminiscent of a Van Gogh's famous painting "Starry Night". We are startled by a brilliant shooting star that is brighter and closer to earth than any of us has ever seen. Trailing behind us, our bubbly, phosphorescent wake slowly fades from sight. On these special nights we never need to assign watches. No one wants to go below and sleep....
 

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Susan Hood Wins Lake Ontario Race in Catalina 320


Tag: adventures

Of course the Catalina 320 is a great cruiser but she performs incredibly well in long-distance races as well.

Kicking of the 2015 summer sailing season with the Susan Hood race would be a test on many different levels.  The Susan Hood is one of three primary racing events on Lake Ontario each year as coordinated by Lake Ontario Offshore Racing (LOOR). The other two are the LO300 and the Lake Ontario Short Handed Racing Series (LOSHRS). Every other year LOOR conduct the LO600 along with the LO300. 2016 will mark the second running of the LO600.

So, about the Susan Hood, what do they mean it starts in the evening?  My son Justin and I are doing the race short-handed and with an evening start that pretty clearly means an overnight will be included.  Okay, that’s the first test.

Promoted (or is that promised?), as the ‘Coolest race on the Lake’, I have to admit I was a bit apprehensive when prepping our Catalina 320, In The Moment,  during those chilly days in early May. Launch was just a few short weeks before this race. Can we be ready in time for the start? Another test I suppose.

They say the Susan Hood is a great ‘warm-up’ for the racing season. Is someone playing with words here? The coolest race is also a warm-up? Is it still considered a warm-up if there’s frost on the canvas in the early morning? Where are those earmuffs?  

Although there were indeed a few tests of the boat and crew, those challenges simply added to the incredible experience and enjoyment we had participating for the first time in the Susan Hood, double-handed. 

The start line was set just off shore from the Port Credit Yacht Club (PCYC) the host of all LOOR events. Fairly light winds from the SW gently pushed us over the line followed by even lighter and occasionally zero winds from WNW in the late evening through 0430. Then as we were ghosting closer to the Burlington Weather mark, which is close to the Burlington Bridge, which is near the entrance to Hamilton Harbour, it picked up. Boy, did it pick up! Ten to 12 knots on the nose and we were suddenly maneuvering through multiple tacks in order to round, and not hit of course, the mark. Very curious looking mark I have to say. Looks like the four legs of a water tower without the tank on top but with multiple spokes sticking out in all directions.

Anyway, the wind continued from the SW after we rounded at approximately 0523 and we charged towards the Niagara mark with winds in excess of 15 knots, gusts over 20.  The boat was surfing at times as the swells built and our speed bounced around in the upper 7s. An exhilarating ride as we exceeding boat speed a number of times and managed the weather helm accordingly.

We turned at the Niagara mark at 0950 and then it really got exciting as we close-reached back towards the finish line at PCYC. With the strong wind continuing to blow WSW we put a single reef in the main to lessen the weather helm while maintaining speed. 

Then, our final test came within 100 metres (328 feet) of the finish line when a squall hit coming off the north shore. We tacked away, quickly furled the genoa and then continued towards the finish line with only the main. We crossed just after 1400.

And, surprise, surprise. We came in 1st in our class!

My family and friends have enjoyed many adventures around Lake Ontario on ‘In The Moment’ including cruising, racing or just relaxing at anchor. We purchased the boat in the fall of 2010 (#638) and she has performed incredibly well even when I put her through the challenges of an overnight long-distance race. 

What a memorable adventure. Can’t wait to do it again in 2016!

 

C320 Collision at the Mark (or You Don't Go Poking a Bear with a Stick)


Tag: adventures

It was the weekly Thursday night JAM, and the second race of the summer series at the Nepean Sail Club on the Ottawa River and my first season with Waltzing Bear, too; sail number 797. I'm not a very determined racer and my crew and I are out to have fun and a post race beer on the water (just one each but still against Canadian Coast Guard regulations). The wind was blowing across the river gusting to 24 knots leaving plenty of white caps but no swell as there is little fetch across the relatively narrow river.

We had one reef in the main and some furl on the jib which left us in control in the gusts if the traveler guy was paying attention to the degree of turn on the wheel. The plan was to cross the start at the non-preferred end on starboard tack; which would leave the bulk of the keen racers battling for position and clean air on the better end of the line. We had been at the preferred end on the same tack the previous week running the line before start with plenty of boats pushing us from the port side...I needed to check the shorts for stains after that one and decided I'd never do it again.
 

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Single-handed Circumnavigation of the World


Tag: adventures

by Patrick Childress

The great solar radiator brightened the horizon and warmed the cabin. I took off the oil skins, no longer needed for their warmth, and collapsed in the bunk. As the sun rose higher, the wind died, The barometer began to drop as well. Afternoon found me refreshed and awake, reading a book in the cabin. The hatch was open to a pleasant, cool day with a perfectly clear blue sky. The light wind had shifted to southwest, putting Juggernaut close hauled and poking along like an old lady on a stroll.

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The Big Step


Tag: adventures

by Patrick Childress

A singlehander sets off aboard his modified Catalina 27 for a non-stop crossing of the Indian Ocean.

The tumble of propellers and thump of heavy engines woke me with a start. I bolted to the companionway to face a singlehander's nightmare: the unforgiving face of a freighter bearing down on my small boat, full speed ahead! Quickly I disengaged the self-steering vane and steered Juggernaut, my Catalina 27, from the path of disaster.

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The Voyage of Easy Street


Tag: adventures
By George F. McCanless, Jr.

(reproduced with permission of Mainsheet, the Catalina and Capri Owners Magazine)

Webmasters Note: This is an excerpt of an excellent article George submitted. Please contact me if you would like an unedited copy. It is an excellent story.

In the Beginning

In November 1997, my wife Christel and I bought a Catalina 320 new out of the box. This is the story of bringing her from Mobile, Alabama, north up the Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway to the point where Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee all come together. Then we turned east on the Tennessee River and brought her to our marina on Guntersville Lake near our home in Huntsville, Alabama. The trip consumed most of December 1997.

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Huron & Michigan Lakes Trip


Tag: adventures
By Tom and Sheryl Young, Forever Young, #660

(reproduced with permission of Mainsheet, the Catalina and Capri Owners Magazine)

My wife and I just completed a 1200 NM trip on Lakes Huron and Michigan. It was a great trip with just a few bad days.

It had always amazed me how people got caught out in storms. Didn't they listen to the weather before they left? Didn't they ask other boaters coming in what the weather was like out there? Didn't they use their eyes and common sense to see what was coming?

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